Addressing Knowledge Gaps in the Treatment of Advanced Endometrial Cancer

Recently, i3 Health provided an educational activity that has challenged knowledge gaps experienced by clinicians regarding emerging checkpoint inhibitor–based strategies for advanced endometrial cancer. 

Cancer of the uterine corpus is the most common cancer of the female genital tract, with an estimated 67,880 new cases diagnosed and 13,250 deaths annually in the United States. Since more than 90% of cases occur in the endometrium, cancer of the uterine corpus is often referred to as endometrial cancer. The mortality rate has increased approximately 2% each year from 2008 to 2017, an increase which may be related to a higher rate of advanced-stage cancers, high-risk histologies, and patients being diagnosed at an older age. There are significant disparities between White women and Black women regarding rates of early-stage diagnosis—approximately 69% vs 54%—and 5-year relative survival—approximately 84% vs 63%. When patients are diagnosed with distant-stage disease, 5-year relative survival rates plummet to 19% for White women and 10% for Black women. Treatments for advanced-stage endometrial cancers are rapidly evolving, including the introduction of checkpoint inhibitor–based therapies. It is vital that clinicians receive educational opportunities in advanced endometrial cancer to keep up with the pace of research and improve patient outcomes.

To address the knowledge gaps experienced by clinicians regarding checkpoint inhibitor–based strategies for advanced endometrial cancer, i3 Health provided a continuing medical education (CME)/nursing continuing professional development (NCPD)–approved video viewpoint strategy session and podcast educational activity. Both the strategy session and podcast activity were made available on May 10, 2022, and remained available until May 9, 2023. The activity was led by two key leaders in the field of endometrial carcinoma: Ritu Salani, MD, MBA, the Director of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles; and Floor J. Backes, MD, a Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at The Ohio State University College of Medicine, The James Cancer Hospital.

A total of 2,184 learners participated in the activity, with 621 completing the activity for credit. Most learners were registered nurses and physicians, followed by nurse practitioners, advanced practice nurses, physician assistants, and those who chose “other” as their profession. Among those who completed the activity for credit, the average number of patients with endometrial cancer per month was 7, and the average number of years in practice was 14.

The baseline data collected revealed knowledge gaps in the following areas: assessing molecular characteristics of advanced endometrial cancer that can inform prognosis and therapeutic selection; evaluating the scientific rationale for targeting the immune microenvironment in the treatment of endometrial cancer; and appraising the efficacy and safety of emerging checkpoint inhibitor–based therapies for advanced endometrial cancer.

Participants were given a matching pretest and posttest at the beginning and end of the activity, respectively. The posttest assessment revealed statistically significant knowledge gains respective to each question and learning objective. The activity produced a 48% increase in understanding of classification of endometrial cancer according to The Cancer Genome Atlas (TGCA) (pretest 44% versus posttest 93%); a 49% increase in understanding the response of endometrial cancer with microsatellite instability (MSI) characteristics to immune-based therapies (pretest 48% versus posttest 97%); and a 56% increase in the understanding of adverse events with lenvatinib/pembrolizumab treatment (pretest 30% versus posttest 86%).

Upon completion of the activity, 82% of participants reported that they felt more confident in treating their patients with endometrial cancer, and 82% reported that they felt the material presented would be used to improve the outcomes of their patients.

The data revealed by the posttest assessment affirm the effectiveness of online educational content pertaining to checkpoint inhibitor–based strategies for advanced endometrial cancer. Based on these data, i3 Health has determined that the multidisciplinary team may benefit from CME/NCPD activities that provide advanced endometrial cancer education on molecular characteristics that can inform prognosis and therapeutic selection, the scientific rationale for targeting the immune microenvironment in treatment, and the efficacy and safety of emerging checkpoint inhibitor–based therapies.

Resources

i3 Health (2023). Emerging checkpoint inhibitor–based strategies for advanced endometrial cancer: activity outcomes report. Data on file.

American Cancer Society (2024). Endometrial cancer. Available at: https://www.cancer.org/cancer/types/endometrial-cancer.html

Related Articles

Responses

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *