Developing a Polygenic Risk Score for TNBC Risk Assessment in Black Women With Holly Pederson, MD, and Elisha Hughes, PhD

At this year’s American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, Holly Pederson, MD, Director of Medical Breast Services in the Breast Center at Cleveland Clinic, and Elisha Hughes, PhD, Director of Research Biostatistics at Myriad Genetics, Inc., sat down to discuss their presentation entitled, “Evaluation of a polygenic risk score as a predictor of early onset triple-negative breast cancer in Black women.”

Tune into this podcast in which Dr. Pederson and Dr. Hughes share insights from their presentation, including:

  • The incidence of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) in Black women compared to White women
  • Unmet needs surrounding accurate risk prediction methods to identify Black women with elevated risk of TNBC
  • What a polygenic risk score is and how can it be used to improve risk assessment
  • How the multiple ancestry polygenic risk score (MA-PRS) compares with mammographic density for managing risk of early-onset TNBC
  • Next steps and more!

About Dr. Pederson and Dr. Hughes

Holly Pederson, MD, is the Director of Medical Breast Services in the Breast Center at Cleveland Clinic, as well as an Associate Professor at Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University. Dr. Pederson’s passion and research focus on breast cancers, risk reduction, and patient advocacy. She is an active participant in breast cancer clinical trials.

Elisha Hughes, PhD, is the Director of Research Biostatistics at Myriad Genetics, Inc. She has degrees in computer science and mathematics, which she uses to develop new statistical approaches in precision medicine. Dr. Hughes’ work focuses on developing novel cancer risk scores for patient papulations with unmet needs in risk assessment, particularly polygenic risk scores for women of non-European ancestry. These risk scores have provided a more accurate method of identifying women who are likely to benefit from increased breast cancer screening and those who can safely reduce their surveillance.

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