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National Cancer Prevention Month: Rising Trends and How to Combat Them With Samuel Kareff, Matthew Hadfield, Waqas Haque, and Joseph Kalis

In honor of National Cancer Prevention Month 2024, members of the Oncology Data Advisor Editorial Board and Fellows Forum sat down for a panel discussion about the rising incidence of cancer diagnoses, factors contributing to them, and how to counsel patients in light of these emerging trends.  

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National Cancer Prevention Month: Lowering Prostate Cancer Risk With Stephen Freedland, MD, and William Aronson, MD

Oncology Data Advisor® · National Cancer Prevention Month With Stephen Freedland and William Aronson In honor of National Cancer Prevention Month, Dr. Stephen Freedland, Urologist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and Oncology Data Advisor Editorial Board Member, sat down with Dr. William Aronson, Professor of Urology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Chief of Urologic Oncology at the West Los Angeles Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center for a conversation about the...

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National Cancer Prevention Month: Rising Trends and How to Combat Them With Samuel Kareff, Matthew Hadfield, Waqas Haque, and Joseph Kalis

In honor of National Cancer Prevention Month 2024, members of the Oncology Data Advisor Editorial Board and Fellows Forum sat down for a panel discussion about the rising incidence of cancer diagnoses, factors contributing to them, and how to counsel patients in light of these emerging trends.  

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National Cancer Prevention Month: Lowering Prostate Cancer Risk With Stephen Freedland, MD, and William Aronson, MD

In honor of National Cancer Prevention Month, Dr. Stephen Freedland, Urologist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and Oncology Data Advisor Editorial Board Member, sat down with Dr. William Aronson, Professor of Urology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Chief of Urologic Oncology at the West Los Angeles Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center for a conversation about the multitude of factors under investigation for prostate cancer prevention. Dr. Freedland and Dr. Aronson discuss prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening recommendations, medications being investigated, the roles of diet and exercise, and how they personally counsel their patients regarding prostate cancer prevention and risk reduction.  

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Breast Cancer Risk Factors and Prevention With Lillie Shockney, RN, BS, MAS, HON-ONN-CG

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In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Lillie Shockney, RN, BS, MAS, HON-ONN-CG, Professor of Surgery at Johns Hopkins University and a member of the National Breast Cancer Foundation (NBCF) Medical Advisory Council, discusses factors in the risk and prevention of breast cancer. Ms. Shockney shares advice for minimizing one's risk of developing breast cancer and explains the genetic factors that can come into play in the development of this disease.

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Vitamin D Supplements for Reducing Advanced Cancer Risk: Paulette Chandler, MD, MPH

In a study recently published in JAMA Network Open, a team of investigators led by Paulette Chandler, MD, MPH, found that vitamin D supplementation is associated with a decreased risk of developing advanced cancer, particularly among individuals with a normal body mass index (BMI). In this interview with i3 Health, Dr. Chandler, an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, discusses the significance of these results and the ongoing research investigating vitamin D supplementatio...

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Thanks to COVID, New Cancer Diagnoses Fell by Nearly Half

During the COVID-19 pandemic, guidelines from the American Society of Clinical Oncology and other organizations have recommended that cancer screening procedures involving in-person visits, such as mammograms and colonoscopies, be postponed. These delays have contributed to a whopping 46.4% drop in the combined rate of new diagnoses for six cancers. This is the finding of a cross-sectional study, results of which have now been published in a research letter in JAMA Network Open, a...

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Cancer Death Disparities Linked to Socioeconomic Factors

Researchers at Yale University have found that county-wide cancer death rates vary substantially according to income, owing largely to factors related to socioeconomic status, health care, lifestyle, and government policies. This knowledge could be used to target the causes of the disparity in the hopes of reducing cancer deaths in lower-income areas. The cross-sectional study analyzed data from 3,135 US counties whose cancer death rates from the year 2014 were made available in a database publi...

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HPV Vaccine Approval Expanded Through Age 45

​In a step crucial to preventing the occurrence of both the human papillomavirus (HPV) and HPV-related cancers, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has expanded the approval of the 9-valent human papillomavirus (9vHPV) vaccine (Gardasil®9, Merck and Co.) for men and women between the ages of 27 and 45. The human papillomavirus infects approximately 14 million Americans each year. It is also a well-documented cause of a number of cancers, including cervical carcinoma and orophary...

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Colon Cancer-Inducing Inflammation Accompanies Obesity

Researchers have found that levels of two inflammation-inducing proteins in the colon rise incrementally with weight, increasing an individual's risk of colon cancer. The third most common cancer in the United States, colon cancer is the second most frequent cause of death of the cancers that impact both men and women. Obesity contributes to colon cancer risk by raising systemic levels of substances that cause inflammation, a complex biological response that can promote a variety of cancers and ...

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In Black Men, Midlife PSA Screening Predicts Aggressive Prostate Cancer

​The first study of its kind to focus exclusively on black men has found that a baseline measurement of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) performed at midlife predicts the later development of aggressive prostate cancer. "Black men in the US are 2.5 times more likely to die of prostate cancer compared to white men, yet screening studies to date have largely been focused on white men," stated co-senior author Lorelei Mucci, MPH, ScD, Associate Professor of Epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan Scho...

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Childhood IBD Linked to Cancer Deaths and Overall Mortality

Researchers have found that childhood inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) puts individuals at increased risk of early death in both childhood and adulthood, with cancer playing a predominant role. For the study, published online in Gastroenterology, researchers from the Karolinska Institutet used data from the Swedish nationwide health registers to identify 9,442 children under the age of 18 diagnosed with IBD between 1964 and 2014. These were compared to 93,180 controls from the general population...

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California: Fewer Smokers, 28% Fewer Lung Cancer Deaths

California's early adoption of aggressive measures to reduce and prevent smoking has dramatically decreased deaths from lung cancer compared with the rest of the United States, according to researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center. Tobacco smoke contains at least 70 known carcinogens, and up to 90% of US lung cancer cases have been linked to cigarette smoking. Lung cancer rates, note the authors of the study published in Can...

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Going Organic Reduces Cancer Risk

A new study has found that by dramatically reducing the risk of lymphomas and decreasing the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, a diet that consists primarily of organic foods can lower an individual's overall risk of cancer. Cancer development has been linked to pesticide exposure, and strict regulations mean that organic foods have a much lower occurrence of pesticide residues than conventionally produced foods do. However, research concerning whether organic foods actually reduce cancer ri...

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Anti-Inflammatory Diet Reduces Risk of Early Death

A study recently published in the Journal of Internal Medicine reports that adhering to an anti-inflammatory diet can prolong life, reducing risk of death from cancer, cardiovascular disease, or any cause. This effect is particularly strong for smokers. The study followed 68,273 Swedish men and women, aged 45 to 83 years at the beginning of the study, over a 16-year period. Using a measure which evaluated consumption of 11 potential anti-inflammatory and 5 potential pro-inflammatory foods, resea...

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Chocolate, Tea, Coffee, and Zinc Might Be the Key to a Healthier Life

Oxidative stress is one of the factors responsible for ageing and low life expectancy. Dr. Ivana Ivanović-Burmazović, Professor and Chair of Bioinorganic Chemistry at Friedrich-Alexander-Universitat Erlangen-Nurnberg (FAU), and her team of researchers discovered that when taken with coffee, tea, or chocolate, zinc has the ability to activate an organic molecule which helps protect against oxidative stress. The FAU team in partnership with Christian Goldsmith, PhD, Associate Professor at Auburn U...

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Do Vitamin D and Fish Oil Cut Cancer and Cardiovascular Risks?

For many years, doctors have recommended vitamin D supplements for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis and other bone-related disorders. Recently, vitamin D has also been considered for the prevention of cancer and cardiovascular disease. In animal studies, omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids from fish oils have also shown promise for cardiovascular disease prevention. But do these supplements actually help in the prevention of cancer or cardiovascular disease? The Vitamin D and Omega-3 Trial (VI...

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Social Isolation May Increase Risk of Death

According to a study conducted by the American Cancer Society, individuals who are socially isolated have an increased risk of death from all causes, including heart disease and cancer, compared with those who have active social lives. Other risk factors, such as hypertension, inflammation, physical inactivity, and smoking, are also associated with lack of social interaction. The study, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, suggests that effective interventions could be influential ...

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Too Few Utilize Post-Adenoma Surveillance Colonoscopy

Although most colon polyps are benign, one type—adenomas—can become cancerous. Advanced adenomas carry a particularly increased risk, so experts recommend a follow-up colonoscopy three years after patients have had them removed. A new study has found that many people who are diagnosed with advanced adenomas do not undergo a subsequent colonoscopy within the recommended time frame. "This is called surveillance colonoscopy, and it improves our chances of preventing colorectal cancer or detecting i...

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Low Sugar Level Helps Virus Attack Cancer

Oncolytic viruses have the capability to attack malignant tumors without damaging the adjacent healthy cells. First, the virus invades the cancer cells; then, it multiplies, ultimately destroying the malignancies. Clinical trials are underway to determine the efficacy of oncolytic viruses in cancer treatment. In the laboratory, cancer cells are typically preserved in high temperatures and on diets of their energy source: sugar. However, in a study published in Cancer Research, scientists propose...

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